Vale la pena considerare tre passaggi, fra gli altri, di un interessante articolo di Ulrike Guérot (http://www.ecfr.eu/blog/entry/germany_in_europe_is_france_ready_for_more_europe, Germany in Europe: Is France ready for more Europe?, 1st September 2011):

 

1) "The German political system at large is getting to grips with three facts: Eurobonds are ultimately the only valid option, they will cost something, and treaty change is needed to get them – and for this a change of the German Basic Law is first needed"; 2) "Unlike Merkel’s initial ‘small steps’ approach at the beginning of the euro crisis – one bailout after another – Germans are now discussing the fundamentals of their country's relations with Europe. Notions of ‘political union’ or even a ‘United States of Europe’ (Minister of Labor Ursula von der Leyen and former Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer) have entered the debate, terms that have been absent from public discussion for a long time"; 3) "Many are waking up to the fact that there is unfinished business in Europe, as the eurozone enters a new phase with the EFSF the entry gate into even deeper fiscal integration. Hence, if Germany is to accept Eurobonds, it has the right to demand trade-offs from its EU partners, in two respects: Firstly, a renouncement of national budget sovereignty – beyond the introduction of a ‘golden rule’ – through some kind of supranational decision-making body on European expenditure; and, secondly, the creation of Europe-wide legitimacy for these common decisions through a parliament for the eurozone (or better: for the Eurobonds zone). If the break-up of the eurozone can be avoided over the next 24 months (collective economic suicide is still an option!), then the German elections in 2013 must and will be framed around the following question: is Germany able and willing to change its own legal basis in order to allow more Europe in the 21st century?"